Thomas Bilney

REFORMATION HISTORY

Most Christians have heard the names of John Calvin, Martin Luther, John Knox, and other giants of the Protestant Reformation in Europe. But there are many other lesser known men and women who worked to advance the cause of the Reformation!

Here is one of these men:

Thomas Bilney, burned alive 490 years ago today at the age of 36.

Thomas Bilney (c. 1495 – 19 August 1531), an English Christian martyr, was born around 1495 in Norfolk, most likely in Norwich. During his life he was nicknamed Little Bilney because of his short stature.

At Cambridge, he studied law, graduating LL.B. and took holy orders in 1519.

One spring day in 1519, the scholar heard of a new book edited by a man named Erasmus in 1516. It was a Greek text of the New Testament set side by side with a new Latin translation done by Erasmus. Thomas Bilney was drawn to the new book out of his scholastic love for the ancient languages, for Greek was fast becoming the talk of all Europe. Bilney went into the streets and finally found a copy. But just as he reached out for it, he drew back in fear. He was well aware that the authorities at Cambridge forbade any Greek and Hebrew Bibles, calling them “the sources of all heresies.” But Bilney’s curiosity overcame his fear, and he purchased the volume of the Greek New Testament and tucked it under his scholastic gown.

Back in his room, Bilney drew out the volume and began to read. Hour after hour came and went as he poured over the words of Holy Scripture. In the pages of that book he found what he had long sought. During his reading in the Epistles, he was struck by the words of 1 Timothy 1:15, which in English reads, “This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners; of whom I am the chief.” “Immediately”, he records, “I felt a marvellous comfort and quietness, insomuch that my bruised bones lept for joy (Psalm 51:8). After this, the Scripture began to be more pleasant unto me than the honey or the honeycomb; wherein I learned that all my labours, my fasting and watching, all the redemption of masses and pardons, being done without truth in Christ, who alone saveth his people from their sins.”

That night, Thomas Bilney was converted to Christ. Fasts, vigils, pilgrimages, purchases of indulgence all had failed. Christ had done on the cross of Calvary what Thomas Bilney could not do for himself. No longer did Bilney seek the chambers of the prelates. He had heard the voice of Jesus of Nazareth.

The Scriptures now became his chief study, and his influence led other young Cambridge men to think along the same lines. Soon, the eager young disciple found kindred spirits at Cambridge. Over a period of several years, a few young men began to meet and discuss the Scriptures at a place in Cambridge called the White Horse Inn. Here were gathered men such as John Lambert, Matthew Parker, John Rogers, Miles Coverdale, John Frith, and William Tyndale. They were men of various interests and backgrounds, but all were united in their love for the Novum Testamentum, and they became known as “the Scripture men.” They were not all at Cambridge at the same time, but Bilney was an important friend to all of them, and his influence and example impacted their lives. Bilney was personally responsible for the conversion of Hugh Latimer, a splendid scholar who joined the little group at White Horse Inn in 1524. Latimer, previously a strenuous conservative, was completely won over, and a warm friendship sprang up between him and Bilney. “By his confession”, said Latimer, “I learned more than in twenty years before”.

All these men knew and loved Bilney as their friend. He was kind, gentle, quiet, unassuming, and patient. The more rugged spirits of bold men like Parker, Rogers, and Tyndale were strongly drawn to the gentle Bilney, and they called him by the affectionate name “Little Bilney.” His short stature and frail body matched this name well.

In 1525 Bilney obtained a licence to preach throughout the diocese of Ely. He denounced saint and relic veneration, together with pilgrimages to Walsingham and Canterbury, and refused to accept the mediation of the saints. The diocesan authorities raised no objection despite his reforming views in these directions.

Cardinal Wolsey took a different view. In 1526 he appears to have summoned Bilney before him. On his taking an oath that he did not hold and would not disseminate the doctrines of Martin Luther, Bilney was dismissed. But in the following year serious objection was taken to a series of sermons preached by him in and near London, and he was dragged from the pulpit while preaching in St George’s chapel, Ipswich, arrested and imprisoned in the Tower. Arraigned before Wolsey, William Warham, Archbishop of Canterbury, and several bishops in the chapter-house at Westminster Abbey, he was convicted of heresy, sentence being deferred while efforts were made to induce him to recant, which eventually he did. A stronger man like Luther or Knox would have stood firm, but “Little Bilney” had wilted under the fierce threatenings and had renounced his errors. Immediately after his recantation, Bilney was oppressed with a deep sense of guilt and unworthiness. Like Peter, Bilney had denied his Lord and had gone out and wept bitterly. He feared that he had committed the unpardonable sin. He was overwhelmed with the thought that, as he had been ashamed of Jesus, so the Son of Man would one day denounce him before the Father. By degrees, Bilney recovered.

After being kept for more than a year in the Tower, he was released in 1529, and went back to Cambridge. Here he was overcome with remorse for his apostasy, and after two years he was determined to preach again what he had held to be the truth. The churches being no longer open to him, he preached openly in the fields, finally arriving in Norwich, where the bishop, Richard Nix, caused him to be arrested. Articles were drawn up against him by Convocation, he was tried, degraded from his orders and handed over to the civil authorities to be burned.

The man who had failed once would not fail a second time. Pointing to the open Bible before him, Thomas Bilney slowly recited these words, “when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee.” A thin and frail man sat huddled over an open book as a candle shed its feeble light upon the open page. The book was opened to Isaiah 43:1-2:

“Fear not: for I have redeemed thee, I have called thee by thy name; thou art mine. When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee.”

Looking up from the passage, Thomas Bilney looked long and hard into the yellow flame on the top of his candle. He cautiously reached out his finger toward the flame, but the hot fire defied his approach and he pulled back in alarm and dismay. If he could not touch the candle, how would he have the courage to face the flames of the stake tomorrow morning?

This question plagued the soul of Thomas Bilney, for he had always been a shy man, hardly the man to be considered a “mighty man of valor.” In fact, he had been just the opposite. He had even faced the stake before and had renounced the truth in order to spare his life. He shuddered as he remembered the awful guilt that had crushed his heart since that day of denial.

On the morrow, “Little Bilney” did not waver from his purpose. A crowd had gathered in the streets of Norwich as he walked resolutely to the fire. Some thought that the weak and frail man would probably recant again. But as the fagots were piled around him, “Little Bilney” raised himself to his full height and said in a firm voice, “Good people, I am come hither to die.” After reciting Psalm 143, he took off his outer garments and was bound to the stake.

As the torch was applied to the wood, Bilney did not flinch. The flames burned high around his face, but a strong wind blew them away. Bilney stood firm as the pile was ignited a second and then a third time. The third time, the fire burned in full strength. Whatever pain the noble martyr felt was bearable, for Bilney held his head high as the flames rose in full intensity around him. He cried out one brief phrase in Latin, “Jesu, credo.” – “Jesus, I believe.” With that dying prayer of faith, “Little Bilney” sunk downward into the fire, and the flames consumed all that was mortal.

The sentence was carried out at Lollards Pit, Norwich on 19 August 1531. After witnessing Bilney’s death, Bishop Nix is reported to have said, “I fear I have burned Abel and let Cain go”.

Thomas Bilney, burned alive for preaching that salvation is found in Christ alone, for denouncing saint and relic veneration, and for refusing to accept the mediation of the saints.

May the memory of our martyred Reformers never be forgotten until the Lord comes!

Source:

Wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Bilney

Christianity.com https://www.christianity.com/church/church-history/timeline/1501-1600/gentle-bilney-burned-for-minor-difference-11629949.html

Spartacus Educational https://spartacus-educational.com/Thomas_Bilney.htm

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19 thoughts on “Thomas Bilney

  1. It’s overwhelming to think how merciful and forgiving God is with our failings. And then to give such grace in Bilney’s eventual death so as affect Bishop Nix so deeply. I wonder if Bishop Nix ever repented… or if he merely brushed off his initial remorse? Thanks for sharing, Crissy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I wondered that very thing myself.
      It’s amazing how our God uses the death of His people to convict. Even the centurion during our Lord’s Crucifixion.
      Have a blessed and peaceful weekend dear sister 💕

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for this article; it was very good and greatly appreciated. I am very much a history buff, and always enjoy such posts. Please keep up your good work.

    Like

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